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11 Ways To Get A US Green Card: Family, Employment & Marriage

11 Ways To Get A US Green Card Family, Employment & Marriage

There are many ways to get a green card in the United States. The most common way is through family sponsorship, but there are also employment-based options. In this article, we will go over 11 different ways that you can get a US green card.

Family-Based Green Cards

If you have a family member who is a citizen or permanent resident of the United States, you may be eligible for a family-based green card. There are a few different ways to get a family-based green card, depending on your relationship to the US citizen or permanent resident.

If you are the spouse of a US citizen or permanent resident, you can apply for what is known as an immediate relative green card. This type of green card allows you to live and work in the United States without any waiting period. You can also apply for a family preference green card, which is for people who have certain family relationships with US citizens or permanent residents. There is usually a waiting period for these types of green cards.

You may also be eligible for a diversity visa, which is also known as the green card lottery. The lottery is open to people from countries with low rates of immigration to the United States. If you are selected, you will be given a green card that allows you to live and work in the United States.

Employment-Based Green Cards

If you want to apply for a US green card through employment, there are a few different pathways you can take. The first is to have an employer sponsor you for a green card. This means that your employer will need to prove that they cannot find a qualified US worker to fill the position you are applying for.

You can also apply for an employment-based green card if you have what is called an “extraordinary ability.” This means that you have exceptional skills or talents in your field that make you stand out from other candidates. If you have an extraordinary ability, you can apply for a green card without needing an employer sponsor.

Finally, certain types of jobs are designated as “specialty occupations.” To qualify for a green card through one of these jobs, you will need to have what is called a “national interest waiver.” This means that your job is in an area of national interest, such as science or medicine. If you have a national interest waiver, you can apply for a green card without needing an employer sponsor.

Investor or Entrepreneur Green Card

The EB-5 visa, also known as the Investor or Entrepreneur Green Card, is a US visa available to foreign nationals who invest a minimum of $1 million in a US business or create at least 10 full-time jobs for US workers.

To be eligible for an EB-5 visa, applicants must meet the following requirements:

  • Make an investment of at least $1 million in a US business
  • Create at least 10 full-time jobs for US workers
  • Be involved in the day-to-day management of the business

The EB-5 visa is a great option for foreign nationals who want to start their own business in the United States. It is also a good option for those who want to invest in an existing US business.

Special Immigrant Juvenile Status

1. Special Immigrant Juvenile Status (SIJS) is a way for certain undocumented immigrant children to get a green card. To qualify, the child must:

  • Be under 21 years old
  • Be unmarried
  • Have been abused, neglected, or abandoned by one or both parents
  • Have a state court order declaring that it is in the child’s best interest to be placed in the custody of someone else or removed from their home country

If the child meets all of these requirements, they can apply for SIJS. Once they have SIJS, they can then apply for a green card.

2. Employment-based immigration is another way to get a green card. There are five different employment-based immigrant categories:

  • EB-1: Priority Workers (including extraordinary ability workers, Outstanding Researchers and Professors, and certain multi-national executives and managers)
  • EB-2: Professionals with Advanced Degrees or Persons with Exceptional Ability
  • EB-3: Skilled Workers, Professionals, and Other Workers
  • EB-4: Special Immigrants (including religious workers, certain employees of the U.S. government abroad, Afghan and Iraqi transl

Asylee or Refugee Status

If you have been granted asylee or refugee status in the United States, you may be eligible for a green card. To qualify, you must have been granted asylee or refugee status on the basis of persecution or a well-founded fear of persecution in your home country. You must also be admissible to the United States.

If you are granted asylee or refugee status, you will be given a conditional green card valid for two years. After that, you will need to apply for a permanent green card. To do so, you will need to show that you have been physically present in the United States for at least one year and that you have not abandoned your asylee or refugee status. You will also need to show that you remain persecuted or have a well-founded fear of persecution in your home country.

Cuban Citizenship

Cuban citizens are eligible for a green card through the Cuban Family Reunification Parole (CFRP) program. This program allows certain family members of U.S. citizens or lawful permanent residents to come to the United States on a parole basis. Once in the United States, they can apply for a green card.

To be eligible for the CFRP program, applicants must be the spouse, child, or parent of a U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident. They must also have been born in Cuba and have a valid Cuban passport. In addition, they must be admissible to the United States and have no criminal history.

The CFRP program is administered by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). Interested individuals should contact USCIS for more information about how to apply for the program.

American Indian Born in Canada

If you are an American Indian born in Canada, you may be eligible for a green card through the Jay Treaty of 1794. The Jay Treaty allows American Indians born in Canada to live and work in the United States without a green card.

To be eligible for this program, you must have a valid passport and proof of your American Indian ancestry. You will also need to show that you have maintained ties to the United States, such as having a US bank account or owning property in the United States.

If you meet all of the eligibility requirements, you can apply for a green card through the Jay Treaty. Once your application is approved, you will be able to live and work in the United States without a green card.

Registry

1. Registry: You may be eligible for a green card through the Registry if you have been living in the United States continually since December 1, 1950, or since January 1, 1972 if you are from the Western Hemisphere. You will need to provide evidence of your continuous residence in the form of utility bills, tax records, or other documents.

2. Family: If you have a family member who is a citizen or permanent resident of the United States, they may be able to sponsor you for a green card. You will need to provide evidence of your relationship to your sponsor, such as a birth certificate or marriage certificate.

3. Employment: If you have a job offer from a U.S. employer, they may be able to sponsor you for a green card. You will need to provide evidence of your job offer, such as a contract or offer letter.

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